Carpenter’s Run for Governor

Bend businessman Sam Carpenter is one of seven Republicans trying to become the first Republican to win an Oregon governor’s race in 30 years. Carpenter is one of two republicans from the east side of the Cascades, who is taking on the incumbent democrat, current governor Kate Brown

Right now Governor Kate Brown and Knute Buehler are the clear front-runners in the governor’s race if you are measuring strictly by the millions of dollars both candidates have raised so far for this race. However, Carpenter points to a poll taken in December that shows he would fare slightly better than Buehler in a head-to-head race with Brown.

Carpenter says he has laid the groundwork by meeting people all over the state and will now turn to the challenging task of catching up in the fundraising efforts, but added that money is not always the deciding factor. President Donald Trump spent the least amount of money of any of his primary and general election challenges and still went on to win the White House.

Supper Club: From Farm to Table

There is a growing movement to make it easier to get locally-grown food from Central Oregon farms to your table. For this week’s Supper Club, Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel sat down with a local farmer, an executive chef, and a woman whose organization works to make locally-grown food more accessible.

Thanks to Elizabeth Weigand, owner at Agricultural Connections, Megan, co-owner at Boundless Farmstead, and Brian Kerr, executive chef at Deschutes Brewery and Public House for joining us.

A special thanks to our Supper Club sponsors, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Supper Club: The State of Our Schools

Recent nationwide studies have ranked Oregon near the bottom of the country when it comes to education spending and test scores so for this week’s Supper Club, Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel sat down with a Bend-La Pine school board member, the president of Central Oregon Community College and the vice president of OSU-Cascades for a closer look at the state of our schools.

Thanks to Rebecca Johnson, Shirley Metcalf and Cheri Helt for joining us. A special thanks to our Supper Club sponsors, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Buehler’s Run for Governor: Part 2

In part two of our interview with gubernatorial candidate Dr. Knute Buehler, Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel delves into Buehler’s positions on the issues that will likely define this election season including health care and the Oregon Health Authority, where hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent with little to show for it.

Buehler, who is currently Bend’s State Representative, is trying to become the first Republican to win an Oregon governor’s race in 30 years.

Buehler announced he was running for Governor last August and sat down for his first extensive broadcast interview since announcing his run with Central Oregon Daily.

 

Buehler’s Run for Governor: Part 1

Bend State Representative Dr. Knute Buehler is trying to become the first Republican to win an Oregon governor’s race in 30 years.
He announced his intention to run for the office last August, and since then, he has been traveling around the state meeting voters.

Buehler sat down for his first extensive broadcast interview since announcing his run with Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel and in part one they discuss how difficult this race could be for Buehler, a republican from the east side of the Cascades, who is taking on the incumbent democrat, current governor Kate Brown

Stay tuned for part two of Central Oregon Daily’s extensive interview with Buehler.

All in the Family

Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel speaks with a Bend family that’s been serving and protecting the community for three generations.

When Bend Police Lieutenant Clint Burleigh puts on his uniform he carries on a family tradition that’s been going on in Bend for seven different decades. Burleigh is the third member of his family to serve in the department. Clint’s grandfather, Bob, started with the Bend PD in 1951, and Clint’s father, Dave, started his police career in Bend in 1974.

Clint now has two children of his own, a 13-year-old and 9-year-old. He said if they came to him and asked about becoming a police officer he wouldn’t recommend that they do the job just anywhere, but if they felt strongly about joining the Bend Police Department he would support them. He said he believes Bend PD does things the right way.

House of Representatives passes tax bill

Updated: Wed, Dec. 20, 2:00 p.m.

The tax bill passed the House again on Wednesday with a vote of 224 for and 201 against, with a handful of republicans siding with democrats and voting no. The bill is expected to hit President Trump’s desk before Christmas, despite push back from democrats and the hundreds of protestors who interrupted votes on both Tuesday and Wednesday.

The Senate changed and voted on the bill again early Wednesday morning, after passing it Tuesday. It passed Wednesday with another party line vote: 51 republicans in favor of the tax bill and 46 democrats and two independents voting against.

Senator John McCaine (R-AZ) was not present for the Wednesday morning vote since he is in Arizona receiving medical care.

The House of Representatives passed the tax bill on Tuesday, despite a handful of republicans and all the House’s democrats voting against it. The bill was stalled for a day and sent back to the Senate after Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) found part of the bill violated Senate rules.

 

Republicans rally behind tax bill

Congress released the final language for the tax reform bill, which lawmakers had the weekend to read over before voting on the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul.

With republicans holding a slim majority in the Senate, it took last minute deals with Florida senator Marco Rubio and Utah senator Mike Lee to increase the size of the refundable child tax credit, to give republicans enough votes to pass the bill with out any votes from democrats.

Tennessee senator Bob Corker has also announced his support for the bill, as did Arizona senator John McCain and Mississippi senator Thad Cochran – both of whom have been out with health issues but plan to be back in D.C. to cast their votes.

Republicans hope to vote as soon as Tuesday and currently hold a 52-48 majority in the Senate since the vote is likely to happen before Alabama’s new senator, democrat Doug Jones, gets sworn in.

FCC Votes on Net Neutrality

The Federal Communication Commission voted to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules at a hearing on Thursday. In a three to two party line vote the agency decided to roll back net neutrality rules which guarantee equal access to the Internet.

The decision was met with protests on streets across the county and online. Proponents of net neutrality fear that providers like Comcast and Verizon could charge Internet giants like Netflix and Google more for faster connections. That may lead to higher costs to consumers at best but supporters of net neutrality fear a worse case-scenario where cable and phone companies could control what consumers are able to see and do online.

Republicans say these fears are overblown.

“The sky isn’t falling, consumers will remain protected and the internet will flourish,” said FCC commissioner Brendan Carr.

Republican FCC chairman Ajit Pai pushed for the change, arguing the Obama-era rules kept Internet service providers from expanding.

“Investment in high speed networks has declined by billions of dollars,” Pai said.

Supporters like Pai believe the decision will allow broadband businesses to prioritize speeds on the Internet and the broadband industry says there are no plans to restrict the Internet.

However, it appears the battle over net neutrality isn’t over. Opponents plan to fight the FCC’s decision in court and the FCC commission’s two democrats hid none of their outrage after Thursday’s vote.

“I dissent from the corrupt process that has brought us to this point,” said FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel.

“The agency that is supposed to protect you is actually abandoning you,” said Mignon Clyburn, the other democrat on the FCC commission.