Shooting Near COCC Campus

Bend Police released the following report on Sunday morning after COCC students were alerted about a shooting near the COCC campus on Saturday night:

Date & Time of Incident: January 6th at 6:52 pm

Type of Incident: Attempted Murder

Location of Incident: 2500 NW Regency

Victim:

Shayne Oloughlin 19 year old male Bend resident

Juvenile 16 year old male Bend resident

Suspect:

15 year old male Bend resident

15 year old male Bend resident

Narrative:

On January 6th at 6:52 pm, the Bend Police Department was notified by Deschutes County 911 of a possible shooting investigation. Bend Police, along with Bend Fire and Rescue, responded to an apartment within the complex at 2500 NW Regency to assist a 16 year old juvenile who had suffered a gunshot wound.

The juvenile was transported to St. Charles Medical Center with life threatening injuries.

The initial investigation found that the 16 year old was with Shayne Oloughlin at Oloughlin’s apartment. Two 15 year old male suspects, who are known to the victims, stole marijuana. During the robbery, they shot the 16 year old victim before fleeing in a vehicle.

Bend Police activated the Central Oregon Major Crimes Team and worked this investigation throughout the night in cooperation with the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office.

Investigators were able to locate both 15 year old suspects and recovered a firearm and additional stolen items. Both juveniles are being lodged at the Deschutes County Juvenile Department on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault in the First Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Burglary I and Robbery I. Based on the type of incident, specific details are being withheld as the investigation is still on going.

The Bend Police Department learned early on that this was an isolated incident and determined there was no direct threat to the immediate area of the incident.

Investigators are asking anyone with information related to this incident to contact Deschutes County Dispatch at (541) 693-6911.

The Major Crime Team was activated for this incident. Members from Bend PD, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Prineville PD, Redmond PD, Oregon State Police and the Oregon State Police Crime Lab assisted with the investigation.

Oregon Ethics Commission Says Hayes Violated Ethics Laws

In a meeting Friday morning the Oregon Government Ethics Commission voted 7-0-1 to accept 22 preliminary findings that Cylvia Hayes violated state ethics laws. One commissioner abstained from a potential conflict of interest for having worked for the state.eals

The commission found that Hayes, fiancee of former Governor John Kitzhaber, used her position as first lady to obtain jobs as a consultant, accept gifts worth more than the limit for a public official and did not handle potential and actual conflicts of interest.

The commission can’t fine Hayes yet. That decision will be held for a later meeting, however each violation comes with up to $5,000 in penalties and commissioners indicated they favor high fines against Hayes as this goes forward.

The Kitzhaber ethics case returns to the commission next week, and the commissioners indicated that both cases deserved significant fines instead of a slap on the wrist.  Both Hayes and Kitzhaber can ask for a hearing before the commission, appeal to administrative judges in state government and then appeal to the Oregon Court of Appeals if they disagree with the eventual outcome.

Neither Hayes nor any representative/lawyer on her behalf attended the meeting. Their absence bothered commissioners who had hoped to question Hayes.

Hayes is expected to issue a statement later today and this post will be updated as more information is released. This story will also be covered today on Central Oregon Daily at 3 p.m. and updated again 6 p.m.

*This story was updated at 4:02 p.m. to express the 7-0-1 vote of the Oregon Government Ethics Commission. The original post wrongly stated that there were 8 votes for the preliminary findings. 

Sunriver Police Chief Charged

Deschutes District Attorney John Hummel completed his review today of the Oregon Department of Justice investigation into a incident involving Sunriver Police Chief Marc Mills.

Hummel charged Mills with misdemeanor harassment based off accounts of a Dec. 1 incident in which Mills struck Sgt. Joseph Patnode in the chest while on duty at the Sunriver Police Station, according to a press release from Hummel’s office.

The incident was reported to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office by another Sunriver police officer.

Mills will have the opportunity to contest the charge at his first court appearance on Jan. 25.

On the Ballot: Measure 101

A tax on insurance companies and some hospitals to provide health care for low-income Oregonians goes before voters next month, even after it was approved by the legislature and signed by the governor during the 2017 legislative session.

Central Oregon Daily’s Lisa Carton attended a public forum hosted by the League of Women Voters of the U.S. on Thursday that explained the pro’s and cons of Measure 101.

Pot Plight

On Thursday the Trump administration lifted an Obama-era policy that kept federal authorities from cracking down on marijuana markets in states where the drug is legal. It is now up to federal prosecutors to decide what to do when state rules collide with federal drug law.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ action came just three days after a legalization law went into effect in California. The lift of the policy now threatened the future of the young industry and created confusion in states, like Oregon, where the drug is legal.

Oregon governor Kate Brown said Thursday the state will fight Sessions’ move to lift the policy on federal enforcement of the drug in order to protect the state’s economic interests. Brown said marijuana is an important component of the state’s economy and has creating more than 19,000 jobs.

Oregon was the first state to decriminalize personal possession of marijuana in 1973. Oregon legalized medical marijuana in 1998 and recreational use in 2014.

It is not clear how the change might affect states where marijuana is legal for medical purposes. A congressional amendment blocks the Justice Department from interfering with medical marijuana programs in states where it is allowed. Justice officials said they would follow the law, but would not preclude the possibility of medical-marijuana related prosecutions.

Officials wouldn’t say whether federal prosecutors would target marijuana shops and legal growers, nor would they speculate on whether pot prosecutions would increase.

 

 

Courtesy of the Associated Press 

Neighbor Trying to Stop Approval of Bed and Breakfast Across from Smith Rock

Deschutes County Commissioners are considering the appeal of a permit that was granted to developers who want to build a bed and breakfast and campground across from Smith Rock State Park.

Central Oregon Daily’s Cydney McFarland was at the county building on Wednesday when both sides made their case to the commission. Commissioners did not make a decision on whether to uphold the appeal. Instead, they are allowing a week for new written testimony from those for and against the project. They will then allow two more weeks for arguments and rebuttals before making a decision in late March or early April.

Olympic Bound: Kent Callister

Kent Callister, a local snowboarder who grew up riding Mt Bachelor will be representing his home country of Australia for the second time in this year’s winter Olympics. Before he heads to South Korea, Kent got a send off from the community that raised him.

Dakine Grindz in Bend partnered with the Mt Bachelor Sport Education Foundation to host an Olympic send off for Callister on Saturday.

Callister started snowboarding with the Mt Bachelor Sports Education Foundation and moved up with that program, began competing and is now heading to the second winter Olympics.

Callister said he is grateful for the support he gets from the Bend community and loves coming back to Mt Bachelor. The 22 – year -old will be in bend for most of January but will then head off to compete in the winter Olympics, which start in February. Callister is hoping to better his 9th place finish in the Sochi Olympics in 2014.

Investigation into Sunriver Police Chief goes to DA

The Oregon Department of Justice has completed their investigation into the allegation made against Sunriver police chief Marc Mills, and has forwarded their findings to Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel.

Central Oregon Daily’s Lisa Carton spoke with Hummel today, who said he’s currently reviewing over 30 pages of information that will assist him in deciding whether to file any charges. Hummel said he is looking in to one specific incident that has been reported but did not speak specifically about the allegations against Mills.

The Sunriver Service District managing board placed Mills on administrative leave the first week in December, but neither he, nor the investigating agencies will explain what the allegations against him are.

No Decision on Marijuana Grow-op

Deschutes County Commissioners decided today not to make a decision on whether or not to allow the proposed marijuana grow operation at Bentwire Ranch to proceed. The roughly 500 square foot grow operation was approved earlier this year but has been halted since neighbors filed an appeal in November.

On Wednesday afternoon the commissioners heard testimony from the grow operation applicants, Lucinda and Chris Baker; Nunzie Gould, the neighbor who filed the appeal; and comments from neighbors who attended the meeting.

Neighbors where concerned about the potential noise and odor produced by the grow operation, as well as security and water use. The water use issue was a topic of decision earlier in the day for the commissioners since for at least half of the year the operation would rely on municipal water being trucked to the property.

The Baker’s lawyer disputed many of the complaints, but after hours of discussion the commissioners decided to keep the public record open for three weeks to allow for further debate. New information on the project will be accepted for the first week and the second two weeks will be open for the Bakers, Gould and their lawyers to make their final arguments. The commissioners now hope to make a final decision by mid-February.