Dancing with the Stars – Mondays at 8pm

Dancing with the Stars: The competition begins with an all-new cast of celebrities who will be paired up with the show’s pro dancers and brave the dance floor for the very first time. Each week these celebrities will leave their comfort zones and endure hours of grueling rehearsals to master new dance styles and technical choreography to perform a dance, which will be judged by a panel of renowned ballroom experts as well as voted upon by viewers. In the end, only one star will rise above the rest to be crowned champion and win the coveted Mirrorball trophy.

The Crossing – Mondays at 10 p.m.

About The Crossing

Jude Ellis (Steve Zahn) is the sheriff of Port Canaan, a small fishing town on the Oregon coast. Having relocated from Oakland to escape a strained marriage and a dark past as a big city cop, his goal is to build a quiet new life for himself and for, eventually, his young son. But those plans for a quiet life change instantly when 47 refugees from a war-torn country wash up on his beach seeking asylum. But the country they’re from is America … and the war they’re fleeing is 180 years in the future. As the Feds set out to uncover the truth behind the mysterious migration, Jude will launch an investigation of his own with the help of his loyal sheriff’s deputy, and Port Canaan native, Nestor Rosario (Rick Gomez).

Reece (Natalie Martinez) is a refugee too, but she’s different. She’s an “Apex,” a member of a genetically engineered human population that possess dramatically heightened physical and mental traits. While in the future she was a soldier—tasked with eliminating members of the lower “Common” class—her only goal once she arrives in Port Canaan is to find her daughter, Leah (Bailey Skodje), from whom she is separated during the Crossing, and who is then taken to a secret camp with the rest of the new arrivals. As Leah tries to adapt to her new surroundings with the other refugees, she will find herself fighting a devastating virus that she has brought with her from the future. But Reece has raised a fighter—capable, resourceful and brave.

Leading the investigation for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is Emma Ren (Sandrine Holt), whose dogged pursuit of the truth is complicated by the fact that her boss, wily DHS Undersecretary Craig Lindauer (Jay Karnes), seems to know a lot more about the migration than he’s telling her. Emma’s second-in-command is Bryce Foster (Luc Roderique), a young, empathetic agent who comes to find himself in over his head. DHS camp guard Roy Aronson (Grant Harvey) is a straight arrow, but his by-the-book nature will be tested once he becomes romantically interested in one of the refugees. Another vital member of the government team is virologist Dr. Sophie Forbin (Georgina Haig), who is inquisitive, driven and has her own personal reasons for researching the Apex phenomenon and what it could mean to the future of science.

The survivors who fled the future in search of a better life include Caleb (Marcuis W. Harris) and his wife, Rebecca (Simone Kessell), who are still struggling with the painful loss of their daughter; Hannah (Kelley Missal), whose sweet exterior masks a gritty survivor who has learned the hard way what it takes to survive; and Paul (Rob Campbell) who is anxious, haunted and desperate to see the outside world.

The news of this mysterious arrival will have the locals buzzing with their own theories, including twentysomething-year-old Marshall (Tommy Bastow), whose disdain for rules and authority will put him on a collision course with some very powerful people once he starts peeling back the layers of the refugee mystery.

As the search for answers in this small town gets underway, the lives of the people here—both the townspeople and these newcomers—will never be the same.

The Crossing stars Steve Zahn as Jude Ellis, Natalie Martinez as Reece, Sandrine Holt as Emma Ren, Georgina Haig as Dr. Sophie Forbin, Tommy Bastow as Marshall, Rob Campbell as Paul, Rick Gomez as Nestor Rosario, Marcuis W. Harris as Caleb, Grant Harvey as Roy Aronson, Jay Karnes as Craig Lindauer, Simone Kessell as Rebecca, Kelley Missal as Hannah, Luc Roderique as Bryce Foster and Bailey Skodje as Leah. Recurring guest star Luke Camilleri as Thomas.

Station 19 – Thursdays at 9 p.m.

About Station 19

A group of heroic firefighters at Seattle Fire Station 19—from captain to newest recruit—risk their lives and hearts both in the line of duty and off the clock. These brave men and women are like family, literally and figuratively, and together they put their own lives in jeopardy as first responders to save the lives of others.

Modern Family – Wednesdays at 9 p.m.

Modern Family

The Pritchett-Dunphy-Tucker clan is a wonderfully large and blended family with Jay Pritchett (Ed O’Neil) sitting at the head. By his side is his vivacious, younger second wife, Gloria (Sofia Vergara), and together they are navigating life with their youngest son, Joe, and Gloria’s son, Manny (Rico Rodriguez), who is heading off to college to explore the world on his own terms. Meanwhile, Jay’s grown daughter, Claire (Julie Bowen), and her husband, Phil (Ty Burrell), are learning to navigate life as empty-nesters with the youngest, Luke (Nolan Gould), now out of high school and looking to his next move; middle daughter Alex (Ariel Winter) is learning how to balance academia and a social life, and eldest Haley (Sarah Hyland) is still living at home as she pursues a career and love. Then there’s Claire’s brother and Jay’s grown son, Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson), and his husband, Cameron (Eric Stonestreet), who are about to enter the dreaded middle-school years with their newly discovered, gifted daughter, Lily (Aubrey Anderson-Emmons). These three families are unique unto themselves, and together they give us an honest and often hilarious look into the sometimes warm, sometimes twisted, embrace of the modern family.

black-ish – Tuesdays at 9 p.m.

black-ish

Like any parents, Andre “Dre” (Anthony Anderson) and Rainbow (Tracee Ellis Ross) Johnson want to give their children the best. But their offspring’s childhood is turning out to be much different than theirs. They now realize at least two things: there is a price to pay for giving their children more than what they ever had, and these loving parents are totally unprepared for the fallout.

Madam Secretary – Sundays at 9pm

Madam Secretary stars Téa Leoni as Elizabeth McCord, the shrewd, determined Secretary of State who drives international diplomacy, battles office politics and circumvents protocol as she negotiates global and domestic issues, both at the White House and at home. A college professor and a brilliant former CIA analyst who left for ethical reasons, Elizabeth returned to public life at the request of President Conrad Dalton following the suspicious death of her predecessor. The President values McCord apolitical leanings, her deep knowledge of the Middle East, her flair for languages and her ability to not just think outside the box, but to not even acknowledge there is a box. McCord’s team includes her Chief of Staff Nadine Tolliver, speechwriter Matt Mahoney, press coordinator Daisy Grant and her charming assistant, Blake Moran. As McCord debates third world problems, finesses foreign dignitaries at work and does battle with the President’s combative Chief of Staff Russell Jackson, that’s just a warm-up for when she goes home to her supportive husband, Henry, and their three children, where “politics” and “compromise” take on new meaning.

Designated Survivor – Wednesdays at 10pm

The series premiere of the most anticipated show of the fall, Designated Survivor, is Wednesday, September 21 at 10pm.

About Designated Survivor:

Kiefer Sutherland stars as Tom Kirkman, a lower-level cabinet member who is suddenly appointed President of the United States after a catastrophic attack on the US Capitol during the State of the Union. Kirkman will struggle to keep the country and his family from falling apart, while navigating the highly-volatile political arena and leading the search to find who is responsible for the attack.