Origin Story: A Passion for Pillows

Creativity courses through the veins of Katie Lipson. She’s always loved creating and is now channeling her gift into home décor, by using textiles with stories. Some are historical, some are cultural, but Katie gives them all new life. In this week’s Origin Story, Allison Roecker hangs out with the ladies of Bryar Wolf

Every Sunday on Central Oregon Daily’s newest feature, Origin Story, Allison Roecker introduces us to a passionate person who is making their dreams come true. 

Origin Story: A Passion for Baking

Can you imagine finding your calling at age 7? Shelbi Blok did just that, and mapped out her bakery dreams with just a crayon and her imagination. In this week’s Origin Story, Allison Roecker introduces us to the owner of Bend’s newest Late-Night Dessert Bar, Too Sweet Cakes.

Every Sunday on Central Oregon Daily’s newest feature, Origin Story, Allison Roecker introduces us to a passionate person who is making their dreams come true. 

Supper Club: Business Challenges Facing Women

Recent research has shown that women led startup companies are less likely to fail than companies started by men–and also bring in higher revenues. However, women who start businesses receive only a small portion of available venture capital funds.

For this week’s Supper Club, Central Oregon Daily’s Anyssa Bohanan sat down with three women who started companies in Bend to talk about the challenges that female founders and CEO’s often face.

Thanks to Talena Barker, CEO and founder of Mission Limelight, Julie Burket co-owner and administrator of Right at Home, and Jamie Danek, CEO and co-founder of Humm Kombucha for joining us. A special thanks to our Supper Club sponsors, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Trump signs Tax Bill

President Donald Trump signed the republican tax bill on Friday, before heading to Florida for Christmas. The bill is the largest tax overhaul in 30 years and passed through Congress without a single democrat vote in the House or Senate. The bill has been criticized for providing permanent tax cuts to large corporation while only providing temporary cuts to most middle to low-income Americans.

Before it passed Congress the tax bill polled low with the American people, with only about 40 percent in favor of the bill. Aside from concerns that the bill favors rich Americans and large corporations, it will also likely hit high-tax states the hardest, which generally means liberal-leaning costal states like Oregon. This is due to the new bill’s limits on SALT deductions, which allowed people to deduct their state and local taxes.

Since the tax cuts for middle and lower- income Americans expire in 2025, many Americans may also see tax increases as time goes on to pay for the new bill’s $1 trillion in tax cuts and the $1.5 trillion it adds to the national debt.

For now Americans could see the new cuts reflected on their taxes as early as this year since Trump signed the bill before the New Year.

On Friday Trump also signed in a continuing resolution that will keep the government funded through Jan. 19 while adding $4 billion to missile defense. A more permanent spending bill will be discussed when democrats and republicans return to D.C. after the Christmas break.