Buehler’s Run for Governor: Part 1

Bend State Representative Dr. Knute Buehler is trying to become the first Republican to win an Oregon governor’s race in 30 years.
He announced his intention to run for the office last August, and since then, he has been traveling around the state meeting voters.

Buehler sat down for his first extensive broadcast interview since announcing his run with Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel and in part one they discuss how difficult this race could be for Buehler, a republican from the east side of the Cascades, who is taking on the incumbent democrat, current governor Kate Brown

Stay tuned for part two of Central Oregon Daily’s extensive interview with Buehler.

Potential Plea Deal for Lara

A potential plea deal for Edwin Lara, the accused killer of Bend resident Kaylee Sawyer, is in the works but far from finalized.

Under the proposed deal Lara would plead guilty to aggravated murder and would receive life without the possibility of parole, but possibility to seek the death penalty would be dropped. This is according to a Facebook posts from Kaylee’s mother, Juli Walden Van Cleave, posted today on her public Facebook page.

The information from Van Cleave was confirmed by a second source that was at the settlement hearing and spoke with Central Oregon Daily reporters today.

The deal is not finalized and attorneys in the Lara case are under a court order not to speak publicly about the case.

Lara is due to go on trial in the fall of 2018 on four counts of aggravated murder in the July 2016 killing of COCC student Sawyer.

Lara, a 32-year-old former COCC campus safety officer, is accused of abducting 23-year-old Sawyer as she was walking home, killing her on the college campus and dumping her body in a canyon west of Redmond.

Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel announced earlier that he would seek the death penalty in the case.

Lara is expected to be in court for a two-day hearing on January 22 and 23.

Tune in to Central Oregon Daily at 3 p.m., 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.

9 P.M. Routine

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has unveil its new campaign to prevent theft, and it’s pretty easy.

How often do you get out of your car after a long day at work and simply forget to lock it? It can be easy to get distracted enough to forget that you’ve left your vehicle unlocked, but it can take just one forgetful moment to make your vehicle a target for thieves.

That’s why the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has begun a new online campaign that they’re hoping will lower the number of thefts seen in the Central Oregon area.

Central Oregon Daily’s Anyssa Bohanan sat down with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Oregon to discuss how they’re hoping the online campaign will encourage residents to lock their doors and discourage thieves from taking what’s not there’s out of unlocked vehicles.

Negotiations with Mills Move Forward

The Sunriver Service District Board agreed to negotiate a potential settlement with Chief Marc Mills during its meeting on Monday.

The Sunriver Service District Managing Board held a public meeting Monday to decide the employment of Police Chief Marc Mills, who was charged Thursday with misdemeanor harassment after an investigation by the Oregon Department of Justice.

According to a statement from Deschutes County District Attorney John Hummel, Mills, 62, struck Sgt. Joseph Patnode while both men were on duty. Mills stuck Patnode hard enough that he fell into the wall behind him. Another officer who witnessed the incident reported it to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office.

Mills has been on paid administrative leave since Dec. 3 and the board is conducting an administrative investigation focused on Mills’ alleged harassment and the culture of the police department.

The board voted on Monday to allow board chair Jim Fister and the service district’s lawyer to negotiate a potential settlement with Mills, who expressed interest in potentially resigning from his position as police chief.

Community members came out on Monday, mostly in support of Mills. Many commented that they would like Mills to keep his job, saying he was beloved in the community both as police chief and as a person.

Hear more from Monday’s meeting with Central Oregon Daily’s Lisa Carton tonight at 6 p.m. and again at 7 p.m.

Shooting Near COCC Campus

Bend Police released the following report on Sunday morning after COCC students were alerted about a shooting near the COCC campus on Saturday night:

Date & Time of Incident: January 6th at 6:52 pm

Type of Incident: Attempted Murder

Location of Incident: 2500 NW Regency

Victim:

Shayne Oloughlin 19 year old male Bend resident

Juvenile 16 year old male Bend resident

Suspect:

15 year old male Bend resident

15 year old male Bend resident

Narrative:

On January 6th at 6:52 pm, the Bend Police Department was notified by Deschutes County 911 of a possible shooting investigation. Bend Police, along with Bend Fire and Rescue, responded to an apartment within the complex at 2500 NW Regency to assist a 16 year old juvenile who had suffered a gunshot wound.

The juvenile was transported to St. Charles Medical Center with life threatening injuries.

The initial investigation found that the 16 year old was with Shayne Oloughlin at Oloughlin’s apartment. Two 15 year old male suspects, who are known to the victims, stole marijuana. During the robbery, they shot the 16 year old victim before fleeing in a vehicle.

Bend Police activated the Central Oregon Major Crimes Team and worked this investigation throughout the night in cooperation with the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office.

Investigators were able to locate both 15 year old suspects and recovered a firearm and additional stolen items. Both juveniles are being lodged at the Deschutes County Juvenile Department on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault in the First Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Burglary I and Robbery I. Based on the type of incident, specific details are being withheld as the investigation is still on going.

The Bend Police Department learned early on that this was an isolated incident and determined there was no direct threat to the immediate area of the incident.

Investigators are asking anyone with information related to this incident to contact Deschutes County Dispatch at (541) 693-6911.

The Major Crime Team was activated for this incident. Members from Bend PD, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Prineville PD, Redmond PD, Oregon State Police and the Oregon State Police Crime Lab assisted with the investigation.

Oregon Ethics Commission Says Hayes Violated Ethics Laws

In a meeting Friday morning the Oregon Government Ethics Commission voted 7-0-1 to accept 22 preliminary findings that Cylvia Hayes violated state ethics laws. One commissioner abstained from a potential conflict of interest for having worked for the state.eals

The commission found that Hayes, fiancee of former Governor John Kitzhaber, used her position as first lady to obtain jobs as a consultant, accept gifts worth more than the limit for a public official and did not handle potential and actual conflicts of interest.

The commission can’t fine Hayes yet. That decision will be held for a later meeting, however each violation comes with up to $5,000 in penalties and commissioners indicated they favor high fines against Hayes as this goes forward.

The Kitzhaber ethics case returns to the commission next week, and the commissioners indicated that both cases deserved significant fines instead of a slap on the wrist.  Both Hayes and Kitzhaber can ask for a hearing before the commission, appeal to administrative judges in state government and then appeal to the Oregon Court of Appeals if they disagree with the eventual outcome.

Neither Hayes nor any representative/lawyer on her behalf attended the meeting. Their absence bothered commissioners who had hoped to question Hayes.

Hayes is expected to issue a statement later today and this post will be updated as more information is released. This story will also be covered today on Central Oregon Daily at 3 p.m. and updated again 6 p.m.

*This story was updated at 4:02 p.m. to express the 7-0-1 vote of the Oregon Government Ethics Commission. The original post wrongly stated that there were 8 votes for the preliminary findings. 

Sunriver Police Chief Charged

Deschutes District Attorney John Hummel completed his review today of the Oregon Department of Justice investigation into a incident involving Sunriver Police Chief Marc Mills.

Hummel charged Mills with misdemeanor harassment based off accounts of a Dec. 1 incident in which Mills struck Sgt. Joseph Patnode in the chest while on duty at the Sunriver Police Station, according to a press release from Hummel’s office.

The incident was reported to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office by another Sunriver police officer.

Mills will have the opportunity to contest the charge at his first court appearance on Jan. 25.

On the Ballot: Measure 101

A tax on insurance companies and some hospitals to provide health care for low-income Oregonians goes before voters next month, even after it was approved by the legislature and signed by the governor during the 2017 legislative session.

Central Oregon Daily’s Lisa Carton attended a public forum hosted by the League of Women Voters of the U.S. on Thursday that explained the pro’s and cons of Measure 101.

Pot Plight

On Thursday the Trump administration lifted an Obama-era policy that kept federal authorities from cracking down on marijuana markets in states where the drug is legal. It is now up to federal prosecutors to decide what to do when state rules collide with federal drug law.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ action came just three days after a legalization law went into effect in California. The lift of the policy now threatened the future of the young industry and created confusion in states, like Oregon, where the drug is legal.

Oregon governor Kate Brown said Thursday the state will fight Sessions’ move to lift the policy on federal enforcement of the drug in order to protect the state’s economic interests. Brown said marijuana is an important component of the state’s economy and has creating more than 19,000 jobs.

Oregon was the first state to decriminalize personal possession of marijuana in 1973. Oregon legalized medical marijuana in 1998 and recreational use in 2014.

It is not clear how the change might affect states where marijuana is legal for medical purposes. A congressional amendment blocks the Justice Department from interfering with medical marijuana programs in states where it is allowed. Justice officials said they would follow the law, but would not preclude the possibility of medical-marijuana related prosecutions.

Officials wouldn’t say whether federal prosecutors would target marijuana shops and legal growers, nor would they speculate on whether pot prosecutions would increase.

 

 

Courtesy of the Associated Press