Ladies of Lead

Redmond Woman Takes Gun Training into Her Own Hands

A Redmond woman has trained nearly 5,000 women in handgun safety and self-defense, which they say has empowered them to feel confident in handling potential life-threatening situations.

Central Oregon Daily’s Brian Jennings introduces us to Sharon Preston and the “Ladies of Lead.”

Supper Club: Mental Health in Local Schools

The recent shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida has re-ignited the national debate over guns. However, there is one issue that all sides can agree on: something has to be done to help people with mental health issues before they commit mass shootings.

For this week’s Supper Club, Donna Britt sat down with three local high school students who helped organize last month’s March For Our Lives to talk about the power of people coming together and the mental health issues they see in their own schools.

Thanks to Lauren Hough, Emma Smith and Vinna Ottaviano for joining us.

special thanks to our Supper Club sponsor, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region in a new edition of Supper Club every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Pro-Gun Ordinance Proposed to Combat I.P. 43

Supporters of the second amendment are trying to fight fire with fire by starting a new initiative that would nullify two propositions aimed at making the sale of semi-automatic weapons and large-capacity magazines illegal in Oregon.

For the past two weekends supporters of the Second Amendment have organized rallies; first in the capitols of all 50 states and then at various locations around Oregon, to draw attention to, and demonstration their opposition against Initiative Petition 43.

On Saturday a group called “Ladies of Lead” helped organize a rally outside Redmond city hall and about 400 supporters showed up to listen to speakers, which included several republican candidates for office in next month’s primary.

I.P. 43 would prohibit the future sale or transfer of semiautomatic rifles and large-capacity magazines and any firearms or ammunition owned at the time that the act becomes effective would have to be registered with state, sold out of state, permanently disabled or given to law enforcement for disposal.

In addition to their opposition of I.P. 43, four Redmond residents have also presented an initiative called the Deschutes County Second Amendment Preservation Ordinance, which would give the sheriff the choice of whether to enforce any local, state or federal gun laws based on whether they are deemed unconstitutional.

Similar Initiatives have presented in other counties across Oregon in an effort to combat the possible adoption of I.P. 43.

Supporters of the ordinance must collect more than 4,000 signatures by August 6 to get it placed as a measure on the November ballot.

2nd Amendment Rally Planned in Redmond

Women Gather in Support for the Second Amendment

This weekend, women across the state are expected to gather at four different locations including Redmond City Hall in a show of support for the Second Amendment. It’s a follow-up to a series of pro-gun rallies that were held last weekend in all 50 states.

Preston says she is asking attendees to refrain from bringing open carry rifles even though it’s legal to do so. She says she wants to work in partnership with local law enforcement and welcomes everybody to what she says is meant to be a family friendly event.

Bend-La Pine Student Walkout

Students Leave Classrooms Calling for Stricter Gun Reforms

Thousands of high school students staged a walkout from their classes today calling for stricter gun reforms and paying tribute to the victims of the Columbine Massacre. At Ridgefield High School in Connecticut, a silent tribute was held for the victims,19 years after the fatal shots were fired.

A spokesperson for Bend-La Pine schools says students who missed classes today will be marked with unexcused absences per state guidance and the consequences for the absences will follow regular protocols. The consequences for the absence are due to participation in the walk-out, not the message of the walkout.

Deschutes County Sheriff Talks IP 43

Deschutes County Sheriff Shane Nelson is taking a stand against a gun control proposal that could end up on the November ballot in Oregon.
Initiative Petition 43 has been filed with the Secretary of State’s office, and supporters are trying to get the signatures needed to get it on the ballot.
Central Oregon Daily’s Anyssa Bohanan sat down with Sheriff Nelson on Monday to ask him about his public opposition to IP 43.

The Sheriff added that, while he doesn’t weigh in on every issue, he commented on the initiative because citizens asked for his opinion on the matter. 

With the initiative quickly becoming a topic of discussion, he decided it was time to make a public statement.

Pro-Gun Rights Supporters Gather at Capitols Across the U.S.

Gun rights supporters gathered at state capitols across the U.S. on Saturday to push back against efforts to pass stricter gun-control laws that they fear threaten their constitutional right to bear arms.

From Delaware to Wyoming, hundreds gathered at peaceful protests to listen to speakers who warned that any restrictions on gun ownership or use eventually could lead to a ban on gun ownership, which is guaranteed under the Second Amendment.

“If you have a building and you take a brick out every so often, after a while you’re not going to have a building,” said Westley Williams, who carried an AR-15 rifle as he joined about 100 people braving blustery weather in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for a pro-gun-rights rally in front of the state supreme court building.

Dave Gulya, one of the organizers of a rally in Augusta, Maine, said about 800 people showed up at the statehouse — a gun-free zone — to make the point that “we are law-abiding.”

Saturday’s protests were planned in dozens of state capitols less than three weeks after hundreds of thousands marched in Washington, New York and elsewhere to demand tougher gun laws after the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17. Organizers of those protests demanded a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, and called for universal background checks on potential gun owners.

In Salem, about 300 people gathered at the World War II Memorial in Willson Park on the west side of the Oregon Capitol on Saturday.

They rallied to support the Second Amendment and oppose a potential state ballot measure, Initiative Petition 43, that would require registration for currently owned semi-automatic rifles and high-capacity magazines and would ban their future sales.

Good Guys With Guns (Oregon) recently founded by Kevin Conzo, organized the Salem event. Conzo said he admires the spirit of the Parkland students who organized the March for Our Lives but disagrees with their solutions to the issue of mass shootings.

“The only ones who obey the laws are the good guys”, said Conzo at the rally. “Creating more laws with law restrictions is hindering our natural rights as human beings. If the sword is gone, I guarantee that the pen is next.”

The Salem version of the national March for Science also was being held Saturday at the Capitol. There was a large police presence but no reported problems, and when the March for Science participants marched past the Second Amendment rally, the speakers stopped their speeches and cheered for the science teachers.

The National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans coordinated the timing of the nationwide events at all 50 state capitols on Saturday.

Sheriff Nelson Speaks Out Against Assault Weapons Ban

Deschutes County Sheriff Shane Nelson spoke out against a proposed gun control measure that could be on the November ballot in Oregon this year.

The organizers behind Initiative Petition 43 met the original deadline of 1,000 signatures by last month, but they will need more than 88,000 valid signatures by July 6th to put the measure on the November ballot.

I.P. 43 is a measure that proposes restrictions on the sale, production and ownership of assault weapons and high capacity magazines. If the measure makes it on the ballot and is passed by voters in November, Oregon residents who currently own an assault weapon would be required to either register the gun with the state, sell it to a registered gun dealer, remove the gun from the state, render the gun inoperable or hand it over to law enforcement.

Under I.P. 43 an assault weapon would be any semi-automatic rifles or pistol with a detachable magazine, semi-automatic shotguns with grip and stock modifications and semi-automatic rifles under 30 inches in length. High capacity magazines are defined as any feeding device that holds more than ten rounds.

The petition was started after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida and has gained support from local activists and organizers of the ‘March for Our Lives.’

The petition has sparked push back from gun advocates across the state and on Friday, Deschutes County Sheriff Shane Nelson posted this statement to his Facebook page:

“As your Sheriff, I took an oath to support the Constitution of the United States of America and the State of Oregon. In addition to this, I swore to perform the duties of Deschutes County Sheriff to the best of my ability. I support and defend the Second Amendment and oppose IP 43.

I serve the 190,000 citizens of our great county and am charged with public safety. Our office has issued over 14,000 concealed handgun licenses and I firmly believe that every responsible and accountable law abiding citizen who wants to legally own a firearm should do so. Firearms have their lawful place in society and are an important tool in personal protection and ensuring public safety in our county.

I understand the concerns of school violence across the country and the role law enforcement plays. Oregon has a number of laws on the books regarding background checks and age restrictions related to the purchase of a firearm. These laws prohibit the sale of firearms to convicted felons, those convicted of misdemeanor crimes involving violence, those adjudicated as mentally ill, those who have been committed as the result of a Mental Commitment Hearing, those with an active felony warrant, active out of state misdemeanor warrant and those on pretrial release for a felony.

Our office continues to take all threats seriously, and we appropriately vet them in partnership with our DA’s Office, mental health professionals, other law enforcement agencies, our schools, and others in the public safety sector. We immediately respond to, investigate threats of violence or danger, and hold people accountable. We are committed to keeping our children and community safe. Deputies of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will always respond to assist and protect the citizens we serve, but you must be prepared to appropriately take care of you and your family until we can get there.”

 

 

Thousands March Against Gun Violence in Bend

Nearly 4,000 community members, led by local high school students, gathered in Drake Park on Saturday to participate in the March for Our Lives – a national movement against gun violence sparked by the school shooting in Parkland, Florida that killed 17 people in February.

Demonstrators began gathering in Drake Park around 11 a.m. on Saturday morning. As the crowd grew local high school students gave speeches asking for politicians to do more to keep them safe in schools. One student sang “Imagine” by John Lennon as Bend Mayor Casey Roats and city council member Nathan Boddie stood on stage behind him.

At noon students, carrying a blue ‘March for Our Lives,’ banner led a march through downtown Bend. The march was so large that the students leading the march came back around to Drake Park before many protestors had even left.

Demonstrators said they were marching specifically for common sense gun control measures including banning bump stocks, semi-automatic weapons and assault rifles; and implementing comprehensive background checks and funding mental health care.

This echoed the messages of the roughly 800 marches that took place across the country on Saturday.

Hundreds of thousands of people marched in Washington D.C., which was led by survivors of the Parkland shooting, but was meant to raise awareness for all victims of gun violence.

The Parkland students shared the stage with other young people from across the country including Edna Chavez from Los Angles who lost her brother to gun violence; 11-year-old Naomi Wadler who spoke to raise awareness about African-American women and girls who were victims of gun violence; and Yolanda King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King Jr.

While millions marched across the U.S., the movement did see plenty of criticism.

The NRA out out a video responding to the march, saying that the students leading the march were part of, and funded by, a “liberal agenda.” The video also said that the answer to school safety would be providing funding for armed guards in schools and arming teachers.

Here in Bend, Central Oregon Daily saw plenty of comments against the march on our Facebook page. Many community members expressed that they felt it was ridiculous for people to march against their Second Amendment Rights. Others said they should march against cars, since annually more young people die in car accidents then due to gun violence, and some echoed the NRA’s message that the march was part of a political agenda.

March for Our Lives

A March for the Survivors

City Officials in Washington D.C are expecting as many as 500,000 visitors in the nations capitol for tomorrow’s March for our Lives, an event that is being organized in part of the survivors of the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Central Oregon Daily’s Anyssa Bohanan has a preview of the local version of the march, which will start at Drake Park at noon tomorrow.