Election 2018: Pot Sales Fail in Sisters and Culver

Voters in the cities of Sisters and Culver rejected measures that would’ve allowed marijuana dispensaries in the city limits.

Voters in Sisters banned both medical and recreational marijuana sales, but a measure that would’ve taxed pot sales if dispensaries had been allowed passed with a majority vote.

Dispensaries are also likely to be voted down in Culver, but the race is still very tight.

Culver Voters Weigh in on Pot Ban

Culver is one of two local cities that currently bans legal marijuana businesses from operating. However, Culver residents will get the chance to either keep or lift the ban this November.
Central Oregon Daily’s Lisa Carton spoke with officials and residents to see how they felt about the ban.

Supper Club: CBD/Hemp Oil

One of the hottest new trends in the cannabis industry right now is CBD, or hemp oil. For this week’s Supper Club, Donna Britt sat down with cannabis industry experts to talk about CBD/Hemp Oil and ask what is it and who benefits from it?

Thanks to Brian Clark, owner of Apex Hemp Oil, Michael Sackin, owner of Mother’s Juice Bar and Cafe, and Jeremy Klettke, founder of Davis Farms, for joining us.

A special thanks to our Supper Club sponsors, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Supper Club: The Benefits of CBD/Hemp Oil

One of the hottest new trends in the cannabis industry right now is CBD, or hemp oil. For this week’s Supper Club, Donna Britt sat down with cannabis industry experts to talk about the pros and cons of CBD.

Thanks to Brian Clark, owner of Apex Hemp Oil, Michael Sackin, owner of Mother’s Juice Bar and Cafe, and Jeremy Klettke, founder of Davis Farms, for joining us.

A special thanks to our Supper Club sponsors, Selco Community Credit Union, for giving us the time and resources to talk about the issues that impact our region every Tuesday night on Central Oregon Daily.

Increased Enforcement for Marijuana Grows

County Commissioners Hoping to Add Two New Enforcement Positions

After months of discussion with state, county and city officials the Deschutes County Commissioners made a first step today in addressing the ongoing issues with marijuana enforcement and regulations in Deschutes County.

County staff confirmed today that they will be looking into the hiring and funding of two new law enforcement positions as part of the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team, known as CODE.
This was an idea proposed and supported by both County Commissioners and Bend City Councilors at a joint meeting held last week.

While CODE serves a tri-county area, these two positions would focus solely on enforcement in Deschutes County. The cost of hiring will likely be split, one going to the City of Bend for a police officer position and one would be a deputy sheriff position paid for by Deschutes County.

Commissioners also discussed raising the applications fees for marijuana grows in order to cover the cost of the extra time and effort county staff to deal with the complicated applications and the appeals that often follow.

Commissioners also floated the idea of putting a temporary pause on the processing of marijuana applications in order to clarify and fill in gaps in the current county code, but they are expected discuss those ideas in depth next week.

Authorities Say Pot Bust in La Pine Points to Bigger Statewide Problem

What started out as a search for a stolen snowboard ended with the bust of an illegal marijuana growing operation in La PineLocal law enforcement officials are calling this a symptom of a bigger problem across the county and the state.

Central Oregon Daily’s Anyssa Bohanan has more on the story.

Pot Plight

On Thursday the Trump administration lifted an Obama-era policy that kept federal authorities from cracking down on marijuana markets in states where the drug is legal. It is now up to federal prosecutors to decide what to do when state rules collide with federal drug law.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ action came just three days after a legalization law went into effect in California. The lift of the policy now threatened the future of the young industry and created confusion in states, like Oregon, where the drug is legal.

Oregon governor Kate Brown said Thursday the state will fight Sessions’ move to lift the policy on federal enforcement of the drug in order to protect the state’s economic interests. Brown said marijuana is an important component of the state’s economy and has creating more than 19,000 jobs.

Oregon was the first state to decriminalize personal possession of marijuana in 1973. Oregon legalized medical marijuana in 1998 and recreational use in 2014.

It is not clear how the change might affect states where marijuana is legal for medical purposes. A congressional amendment blocks the Justice Department from interfering with medical marijuana programs in states where it is allowed. Justice officials said they would follow the law, but would not preclude the possibility of medical-marijuana related prosecutions.

Officials wouldn’t say whether federal prosecutors would target marijuana shops and legal growers, nor would they speculate on whether pot prosecutions would increase.

 

 

Courtesy of the Associated Press 

City Councilors Debate Recreational Marijuana

Ever since Oregon legalized the sale of recreational marijuana, cities and towns across the state have mostly jumped at the chance to join in and scoop up hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual tax revenue. However, on Tuesday, city councilors in Prineville are thinking about bucking that trend.

Central Oregon Daily’s Mackenzie Wilson went to Prineville to find out why.

Attorney General Brings Concern Over Marijuana Laws

In the past few years, states like Oregon, Washington and Colorado have legalized the sale of recreational marijuana at a state level, even thought it goes against federal marijuana laws. Now, the arrival of a new attorney general has some lawmakers and everyone in the legal marijuana industry concerned about what the federal government may enforce going forward.

Central Oregon Daily’s Mackenzie Wilson has the story.