Redmond Seeks Funds For Three New Police Officers

The Police Department in Redmond is asking for more officers to address the growing population of their community, but now the question is, how does the city pay for those officers?

Central Oregon Daily’s Curtis Vogel joins us with a look at the budget discussions going on in Redmond tonight.

The Redmond Police Department says the originally-planned increase in officers would have helped them establish a drug enforcement team, increase the size of daily patrol teams on duty and help reduce traffic violations and accidents as well as institute a downtown foot patrol.

With the public safety fee idea now shelved, the City of Redmond’s budget director says they are going to have to pull from other departments budget to even add three more police officers.

Five Dogs Rescued from Redmond Home

On February 25, 2018 the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office received a call from a concerned citizen reporting several dogs abandoned on a property in Redmond.

Deputies were dispatched to the 3900 block of NW Progress Lane in Redmond, to check on the dogs, which the citizen said had likely not been cared for in several days.

Deputies observed several dogs inside the residence through a window and attempted to contact the last known resident of the home, but those attempts were unsuccessful.

On February 26, deputies executed a search warrant and rescued four pit-bull mix and one Chihuahua mix dogs. A fifth pit-bull mix dog was found dead on the property. The Sheriff’s Office said through its investigation in was concluded that the dogs were likely not fed, cared for, or checked on for at least six days prior to being seized.

On February 28, Anne M. Springer of Redmond, who was determined to be the owner of the six dogs, was cited in lieu of custody on five counts of Animal Neglect II and one count of Animal Neglect I.

The five dogs are currently at Brightside Animal Center in Redmond.

Change of Heart on Redmond Safety Fee

Redmond City Council Decides Not To Add Public Safety Fee to Residents’ Water Bills

From the beginning of a plan to add six dollars to Redmond residents’ water fees to pay for more police officers on the street, City of Redmond, Oregon Mayor George Endicott repeatedly said the Public Safety Initiative was merely a proposal and not the final word on the matter. On Tuesday night, after months of research and feedback on the so-called Public Safety Fee, Mayor Endicott and the Redmond City Council decided to table the Public Safety Initiative and prioritize public safety in the upcoming 2018-19 Budget instead.
If the Public Safety Fee had been implemented, city leaders say the funds could have paid for the hiring of up to eight more police officers in the next few years, but now, they say that number will likely be reduced to four if the city can find the available funds in the budget.